Tour code: TMCOTD-23

The Majestic Climbs of the Dolomites

Enjoy the no-compromise cycling vacation on the Dolomites: you will be able to tell that you have done the most iconic and famous climbs in the Dolomites.

Date 1

starts on: 16/06/2023
ends on: 23/06/2023
Type: Scheduled

Date 2

starts on: 01/09/2023
ends on: 08/09/2023
Type: Scheduled

The ultimate Dolomites experience

 

That's the tour designed by cycling lovers for cyclists who wish to enjoy a no-compromise cycling vacation on the Dolomites. To put together the perfect Dolomites experience, we designed this tour favoring riding experience over logistics, we designed it just the way we wanted to ride it. At the end of this tour, you will be able to tell that you have done the most iconic and famous climbs in the Dolomites.

As a basecamp for our rides, we have chosen two of the most renowned towns: Cortina and Canazei, which guarantee us accommodation and hospitality at the highest level. From those locations, we have designed six stages conceived for cyclists with an average level of preparation that will take us to pedal on the most coveted climbs by cyclists from all over the world, both for the stunning views and because they are part of either the past and the present of the sport we love most. These are the climbs on which important pages of the history of cycling and of the Giro d'Italia have been written.

We begin our trip in the beautiful town of Cortina, a tourist resort that has already hosted the Winter Olympics and is preparing to host the 2026 edition. From there, in two days on the bike, we'll be climbing up the Tre Cime Lavaredo, Passo Tre Croci, Passo Giau and Passo Falzarego. We will then leave Cortina and cycle to the next base, Canazei - one of the most beautiful villages in this region - on a stage that will do two memorable climbs: Passo Falzarego and Passo Fedaia. From Canazei the show goes on: in two days we will cycle the famous Sellaronda ring: a four aces poker featuring Passo Sella, Passo Pordoi, Passo Campolongo and Passo Gardena. We'll explore more over the next days, climbing up the Passo di Valles and the Passo San Pellegrino.

You might think you did it all, right? But as insiders we tell you it's a shame to leave Dolomites before riding the pristine Passo delle Erbe. Let's do it on an inline stage that ends in Brixen, where we'll celebrate the end of an unforgettable trip, and start watch our schedule to make space for the next visit to this special cycling resort.

Now it's clear why we talk about the Ultimate Dolomites Experience!

The Pro Tour Series
The Journey Begins Here

TOUR STOPS AND TOPS

Things You Don't Want to Miss
  • What paradise looks like...
    on a dry day

  • Vincenzo Nibali
    A Sicilian beating the cold

  • Giro d'Italia 1968
    Merckx wins the stage and wears the Pink Jersey

Ride Highlights:
Rifugio Auronzo, 2013 A.D.

Giro d'Italia 2013. It was May 25, but it felt like the middle of winter, amid snow, rain and gusts of wind. Resisting the temptation to manage the now certain success, Vincenzo stretched out with three kilometers to go, on terrible gradients, quickly getting rid of the very few who could initially hold his wheel. He advanced like a spectre in the blizzard and won alone, while the others spit their souls out for placings. He had managed to turn a comfortable triumph into a piece of great cycling. The next day, in Brescia, he celebrated the first of his two Giro d'Italia victories. Far away, in the GC, Ryder Hesjedal, who won the 2012 Giro, Michele Scarponi, Cadel Evans, Rigoberto Uran. And the most awaited, the team flag bearer Sky Bradley Wiggins.

"I have always hated this climb: it always leaves you breathless, because you have no reference, I hate it and today I don't think I have changed my mind!"

Vincenzo Nibali, after his victory up Tre Cime
Tour highlights

Trip program

Total distance: 444.6km

total elevation: 12,526m

duration: 8 days

difficulty level: Challenge

DAY 1: ARRIVAL DAY

Arrival at Milan airport (MXP) and transfer to Cortina (Veneto). Accommodation, bike-fitting and warm-up, and dinner at three-star hotel.

DAY 2: CORTINA LOOP

70.6km | 1,919m | 1,919m | 4,30h

The first stage has been designed to make it clear from the beginning the going of following, intense, days. We leave Cortina heading east in an anti-clockwise (contra relogio in the Ladin language) route to the first climb of our week: Passo Tre Croci, named after a legend about a mother and her 2 children who died on Passo while trying to reach Cortina in search of a job. Passo Tre Croci has been part of the Giro d'Italia route in 1966. It’s a 8.1km climb with average incline of 7.1% up to top. After it, we enjoy a short downhill to one of the most photographed spots in the region: the lake of Misurina, located at 1754m ASL. After a refreshment stop on the lake's shoreline, we face the main dish of the day: the climb up the Tre Cime di Lavaredo. It's a challenging 7km climb but the last 4 are those you'll remember most as the average incline is a tad below 12%. You will want Merckx's legs up here: Eddy won in 1968, on a snowy stage, and wore the Maglia Rosa: Tappa e Maglia (stage and Jersey in one shot) as RAI commentators use to say! Funnily, most every time a Giro stage finished up Tre Cime, there was a snow storm that made the stage epic. For sure as nice to watch as painful to ride. Once on top, we have a long way down to Cortina and, next, one last climb to the hotel: five kilometers to get us ready for a well deserved food break.


Accommodation: 3-star hotel

Meals: Breakfast | After ride break | Dinner

DAY 3: PASSO GIAU AND PASSO FALZAREGO

56,8km | 1,930m | 1,931m | 3,45h

The going is getting tough within the second stage: it's a short stage with two climbs, we take on the Falzarego pass as a starter an then the menù offers a real beast: Passo Giau. Falzarego is a smooth climb going up for 16.4 km averaging 5.6% incline. Good for warming up. Giau is a Hors Catégorie climb, one of those rare uphill that can change the whole course of a stage race. It's, in fact, a 10.2 km and 9.1% gradient ascent, ending at 2236m ASL. Certainly one of those trophies that a dedicated cyclist should take home! Once on top, we enjoy the awesome views and the lovely mountain hut and take a break for a well earned cappuccino and snacks. It's going to be for sure a cappuccino with a view: a 360-degrees picture that includes the twin peaks of Nuvolau and Averau, both above 2600 meters. We can take our time up there, and sip our cappuccino without rush: from the Pass is a 12km downhill road up to the hotel.


Accommodation: 3-star hotel

Meals: Breakfast | After ride break | Dinner

DAY 4: RIDE UP PASSO FEDAIA AND FALZAREGO

58,2km | 1,743m | 1,827m | 3,30h

Ready, Steady, off we go for a second time over Passo Falzarego. Now we know the consistent and smooth slopes and - just like the day before - this is only a foreplay before what we have to ride on this day: the Infamous Passo Fedaia. Fedaia is one of those iconic climbs of the Dolomites either for the steepness of the road and the beauty of landscapes we are surrounded by. Ascent is 12.8km long at 8% gradient. But what makes this climb so hard is its straight part - right in the middle - known as Malga Ciapela, a section almost three kilometers long, averaging 12% incline, but with many meters at 15%. Malga Ciapela is a nightmare among Italian amateurs cyclists and since last Giro d'Italia for Carapaz too: that's exactly where the Australian Jay Hindely dropped the at-the-time race leader Richard Carapaz to go get the Maglia Rosa Jersey and become the first Aussie to win the Giro. Up the Passo there is a 2km flat section with a lovely road coasting an alpine lake, before getting to a cozy restaurant: climb is over and for us it's time to make stop, take a rest, get a drink and let the colors of the sky reflected by the surface of the waters be joy to our eyes. Once our break is over, we just have a short downhill to Canazei, our second base in the Dolomites, where we will get a warm welcome by the three-star hotel with our privileged location to see the alpenglow sunset.


Accommodation: 3-star hotel

Meals: Breakfast | Dinner

DAY 5: CANAZEI LOOP: THE SELLARONDA CLASSIC

64.6km | 2,065m | 2,066m | 3,50h

Today we have the famous Sellaronda classic loop. Can you dream of anything better than this ride? The circular route, amidst fascinating natural landscapes, leads through some of the most attractive roads and well-known Dolomite passes and you know what's best of it: it's a 64k ride with no flat: you go up, or you go down. There are no other ways and that's exactly what the Italian amateur loves about it. You get your bike, you go out, you take on the Pordoi (2239 meters asl), then you take on the Campolongo (1875mts asl), then you take on the Gardena (2121mts asl) and finally you take on the Sella (2240mts asl). 4 Dolomites passes in a relatively short ride. Passo Pordoi is strictlyy twisted the history of the Corsa Rosa. Fausto Coppi, the Campionissimo as he was named, maybe the greatest of all Italian sportsmen, was first for 6 different times on the Pordoi and on 4 occasion he went on to win the Giro. Campolongo is the shortest with its 4k averaging 7.4% incline, leading us to the 1800 metres of the pass of the same name; Once at the top we are on the gateway to the enchanting Alta Badia, one of the most remote Dolomite valleys, far removed from cultural changes. In Alta Badia the sky is bluer, the grass is greener and the peaks are monumental. We descend to the bottom of the valley and from there we attack the 9 km of the Gardena Pass. The 9 km climb is the longest of the day, but it will be gentle and steady because the scenery that accompanies us is the best any cyclist can dream of: sweeping sights of the most majestic Dolomite mountains, including the marvelous Sassolungo, one of the most famous peaks in Alta Badia. After a short, fast descent, the last difficulty of the day attacks. Only 5.4 km separate us from the Sella Pass where we can finally refresh ourselves at the pass bar, coffee and cappuccinos await us while we can look up 3150 metres and see the Mountain that gives its name to the pass: according to many it is a real rock castle, according to others it is a large and majestic island reaching for the sky. The descent will be fast to Canazei while our mind will be intent on trying to catch some still images and take them with us to the finish line. We will hardly see so much beauty in the few kilometres of the Sellaronda.


Accommodation: 3-star hotel

Meals: Breakfast | Dinner

DAY 6: PASSO ROLLE, PASSO SAN PELLEGRINO, PASSO VALLES

100,7km | 2,393m | 2,393m | 5,50h

Usually at Grand Tour races after a short stage there's a long one and here we go with first 100k stage. We leave our HQ to ahead south and the beginning is fast and slightly downhill up to old village of Predazzo whose origins date back to the 1035. From there we have the first climb on the day and it will be our longest ascent: the road goes up for 20.5k up to the 1935 meters over the Passo Rolle. We can split this climb in two section: the first is about 10k to the Alpine Lake of Paneveggio where slopes flatten a bit following the shore of the lake, afterwards it is another 9k to Passo Rolle. This second split is steeper with inclines peaking the 10%. If the punchy climb erodes our legs our eyes will be paid back by the stunning view of another iconic dolomites peak: the Pale di San Martino. After a short break in San Martino di Castrozza we head back on a 9k downhill to get again on our route. The descent is fast and soon we have another climb to Passo Valles, 6k at 8.2% gradient. At the top we are another time over the 2000 meters asl and again time to take some pictures. This is pure Dolomite riding: cycling here means never resigning yourself to the idea that after a descent a climb awaits us immediately. And it's just like that after the downhill from to Passo Valles. After the descent from the pass we cross the climb that connects Cencenighe to San Pellegrino. As soon as the road begins to raise, we immediately have 2 km with gradients of over 12%. After that the remaining 4km are 'easier' with an average gradient of 8%. Over the pass the sight of lovely church will not be a mirage but a sign that for today climbing is over. Ahead, only one long downhill left up to Moena and after that we hit back home following same road we rode in the morning. Another day has gone and anything will be nicer then coming back to our HQ in Canazei. Just like a real Pro after the queen stage relaxing and staying in the wellness area is a suitable moment to think back at what we have achieved in our day out: 3 mountain peaks and almost 2400 meters up: Giro D'Italia is often easier then this!


Accommodation: 3-star hotel

Meals: Breakfast | Dinner

DAY 7: PASSO DELLE ERBE, PASSO SELLA E GARDENA

94.8km | 2,493m | 3,380m | 5,30h

Here we are at the last stage, but don't think the climbing fest is over. As keen cyclists we can never get enough of scenic roads and endless climbs. Just like at the Giro where the last stages are always the most treacherous, on the last day we have set aside another 95km, three passes, but above all the maximum elevation gain: today we are climbing 2500 metres. As soon as we leave hotel we go up the 11.7km uphill to Passo Sella from the south road. Once there, it’s up and down to Passo Gardena. What we get after the pass it’s a nice 26km downhill through Alta Badia valley before we take on the very nice Passo delle Erbe climb, a beauty that a lot of time is neglected for mere logistic reasons. It's for those in the know. Even the Giro only rode 3 times up to this majestic climb. The American Andrew Hampsten was the first at the Passo delle Erbe KOM on the 13th stage at the 1993 Giro d'Italia. We are still in the Dolomites and exactly like the name of pass itself evokes, the landscapes and nature are pretty different: it’s a green and wooded area as it’s all grass and flowers all around with less rocks all around. We couldn't figure out no better spot while sipping our last cappuccinos: The pass is beautifully set between the gentle pastures of Luson to the north and the meadows of Pütia, with the steep walls of the mountain to the south. From here we have access to one of the most precious natural environments in the Dolomites. Before heading towards the beautiful and pleasant town of Bressanone there is only the twisted and narrow 26 km long descent: yet another hidden beauty unknown to most, in fact the road plunges down into the valley following the canyon carved out by the Isarco river, which accompanies us to the last destination of the tour.


Accommodation: 3-star hotel

Meals: Breakfast | Dinner

DAY 8: FAREWELL AND DEPARTURE DAY.

Transfer to Milan or Bergamo airport and end of services.

Tour price

And support levels

Guided group tour

From €: 2,169

What's included

Accommodation

7 nights at 3-stars

Meals
6 dinners; all breakfasts.
Support level
Guiding; van assistance; mobile workshop; spare bike, bars, gels and electrolytes available on purchase; luggage transport; group transfers from/to Bergamo (BGY) or Milano (MXP) airport; 10% discount on bike rental.
Not included
Flight tickets; extras in hotel, etc. Drinks during the dinner; city tax (if any); travel insurance; individual arrival and departure transfer; bike rental.
On request

Individual arrival transfer from Milano Malpensa/Bergamo airport to Cortina €350/250 p.p.; individual departure transfer from Bressanone to Milan/Bergamo airport €350/250 p.p.; supplement for single room accommodation €320 p.p.; 10% discount on bike rentals.

Self Guided tour

From €: 1,099

What's included

Accommodation

7 nights at 3-stars

Meals
6 dinners; all breakfasts.
Support level
Detailed briefing. GPX files. Telephone assistance during your stay. 10% discount on bike rentals.
Not included
Flight tickets; extras in hotel, etc. Drinks during the dinner; city tax (if any); travel insurance; arrival and departure transfer; bike rental. Luggage transfer.
On request

Arrival transfer from Milano Malpensa/Bergamo airport to Cortina €350/250 p.p.; departure transfer from Bressanone to Milan/Bergamo airport €350/250 p.p.; supplement for single room accommodation €320p.p.; 10% discount on bike rentals. Luggage transfer Cortina-Canazei-Bressanone €375 (+10€ p.p).

Supported tour

From €: 1,499

What's included

Accommodation

7 nights at 3-stars

Meals
6 dinners; all breakfasts.
Support level
Van assistance; mobile workshop; spare bike, bars, gels and electrolytes available on purchase. GPX files. Luggage transport. Group transfers from/to Malpensa/Bergamo Milano airport; 10% discount on bike rentals.
Not included
Flight tickets; extras in hotel, etc. Drinks during the dinner; city tax (if any); travel insurance; individual arrival and departure transfer; bike rental.
On request
Individual arrival transfer from Milano Malpensa/Bergamo airport to Cortina €250/350 individual departure transfer from Bressanone to Milan/Bergamo airport € 350/250 p.p.; supplement for single accommodation € 320 p.p.; bike rental 10% off
Useful Information

Tips & Resources

Travel arrangements

The best airport for arrivals is Milano/Bergamo (BGY): from there we arrange the group transfer. On the way, we stop at Milano MXP if more riders will land there. Other options (Venice, Verona) are possible and we can help you select the best one and arrange a transfer.

Guests travelling on guided, self guided or supported trips, can individually reach Cortina: from Venice Airport on the Cortina Shuttle. From Milano Malpensa Airport: MXP express train to Milan Central Station (runs every 20'), train from Milan Central Station to Venezia Mestre FS, Cortina Express from Venezia Mestre to Cortina.

For any other request about reaching Cortina with public transport please don't hesitate to get in touch with us.

Food & Drinks during stages

During the rides we plan at least one longer food stop in the middle of the stage plus one or more coffee stops. In the assistence van we have bars, gels and water.

Necessary Gear

Our guests will get a pre tour info kit that gives useful suggestions on how to enjoy our trips in full. Here is a quick selection that might be useful at this stage.

  • We suggest renting a Canyon bike with us. But feel free to bring your own bike. Just consider bringing along a selection of model specific spare parts (ie. derailleur hangers). 

  • The hotels have a room for the bikes, and we will have a selection of tools to perform basic maintenance.

  • Bring along a wide selection of clothes, including some full arm jackets, rain coat, leg and arm warmers, overshoes: it's the Alps and the weather is never completely predictable.

Useful Information
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